source

The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report released earlier this year by Dice and The Linux Foundation analyzed trends for open source careers and the motivations of professionals in the industry. Now, the data have been broken down to focus specifically on European open source professionals, and how they compare to their counterparts around the world.

open source jobs

This is the fifth year Dice and The Linux Foundation have partnered to produce the jobs report. The four previous years’ research focused exclusively on the job market for Linux professionals, but this year’s installment looks at the broader category of open source professionals. Overall trends between Europe and the world are generally similar, but show that open source careers may be even more in demand and rewarding in Europe than the rest of the world.

“Demand for open source talent is growing and companies struggle to find experienced professionals to fill open roles,” said Bob Melk, president of Dice. “Rising salaries for open source professionals indicate companies recognize the need to attract, recruit and retain qualified open source professionals on a global scale. Regardless of where they reside around the world, these professionals are motivated by the opportunity to work on interesting projects.”

European confidence is high

Europeans are more confident than their global counterparts in the open source job market. Of over one thousand European respondents, 60 percent believe it would be fairly or very easy to find a new position this year, as opposed to only 50 percent saying it would be easy globally.

In fact, 50 percent of Europeans reported receiving more than 10 calls from recruiters in the six months prior to the survey, while only 22 percent of respondents worldwide reported this level of engagement. While worldwide 27 percent of respondents received no calls at all from recruiters, only five percent of Europeans said the same.

The most in-demand skills

Application development skills are in high demand in Europe. Twenty-three percent of European open source professionals reported application development as the most in-demand skill in open source – higher than any other skill. Globally, only 11 percent identified application development as the most in-demand skill, second behind DevOps at 13 percent. DevOps was second among Europeans at 12 percent.

Retaining staff

Employers in Europe are offering more incentives to hold onto staff. Forty percent of European open source professionals report that in the past year they have received a raise, 27 percent report improved work-life balance, and 24 percent report more flexible schedules.

This compares to 31 percent globally reporting raises, and 20 percent globally reporting either a better work-life balance or more flexible work schedules. Overall, only 26 percent of Europeans stated their employer had offered them no new incentives this year, compared to 33 percent globally.

What differentiates open source jobs?

Open source professionals enjoy working on interesting projects more than anything. European open source professionals agreed with their global counterparts that the best thing about working in open source is the ability to work on interesting projects, at 34 percent (31 percent globally). However, while respondents around the world said the next best things were working with cutting-edge technology (18 percent) and collaboration with a global community (17 percent), European professionals selected job opportunities second at 17 percent, followed by both cutting-edge technologies and collaboration tied at 16 percent each. Five percent of European respondents said money and perks are the best part of their job, more than double the two percent who chose this response worldwide.

“European technology professionals, government organizations and corporations have long embraced open source,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “The impressive levels of adoption of and respect for open source clearly have translated into more demand for qualified open source professionals, providing strong opportunities for developers, DevOps professionals and others.”

The findings of the annual Open Source Jobs Report are based on survey responses from more than 4,500 open source professionals worldwide, including 1,082 in Europe.


Help Net Security

The Arduino team is using Kickstarter to crowdfund their latest project: the ESLOV IoT Invention Kit.

ESLOV is a system of intelligent modules that can be connected in an endless variety of ways, and is meant to simplify the creation of Internet-connected devices.

Arduino's new open source kit makes creating IoT devices easy

The connected modules are plugged into a Wi-Fi and motion hub, which will connect the device (project) to the Internet. Then, the hub has to be connected to the user’s PC so that it can be programmed.

Programming it is extremely easy, though – in fact, no actual programming knowledge is required. By using the ESLOV’s visual code editor, which recognises the modules automatically, the user needs to simply draw connections between them, and the device is ready to be used.

Once the device is connected to the Arduino cloud, the user can control it and interact with it from anywhere, via a computer or smartphone, through a user-friendly interface.

The ESLOV kit consists of the wireless hub and 25 modules. The team welcomes third-party modules – design files and documentation for all modules will be made publicly available, to make it easier for creative people to design and create their own.

The ESLOV kit consists of the wireless hub and 25 modules

The Arduino team needs to raise $ 500,000 to finish the development and production of the ESLOV kit. Potential funders can choose to receive kits of different sizes, priced from $ 49 (you receive just the Wi-Fi hub) to $ 499 (PRO kit: Hub + 22 modules). The various kits can also be combined.

Delivery of the hardware to the backers is scheduled for June 2017.

More technical information can be head on the Kickstarter project page or this blog post.


Help Net Security

Meet Apache Spot, a new open source project for cybersecurity

The Apache Spot project was announced at Strata+Hadoop World on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016.

Credit: Katherine Noyes

Hard on the heels of the discovery of the largest known data breach in history, Cloudera and Intel on Wednesday announced that they've donated a new open source project to the Apache Software Foundation with a focus on using big data analytics and machine learning for cybersecurity.

Originally created by Intel and launched as the Open Network Insight (ONI) project in February, the effort is now called Apache Spot and has been accepted into the ASF Incubator.

[ Also on InfoWorld: 19 open source GitHub projects for security pros. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld's Security newsletter. ]

"The idea is, let's create a common data model that any application developer can take advantage of to bring new analytic capabilities to bear on cybersecurity problems," Mike Olson, Cloudera co-founder and chief strategy officer, told an audience at the Strata+Hadoop World show in New York. "This is a big deal, and could have a huge impact around the world."

Based on Cloudera's big data platform, Spot taps Apache Hadoop for infinite log management and data storage scale along with Apache Spark for machine learning and near real-time anomaly detection. The software can analyze billions of events in order to detect unknown and insider threats and provide new network visibility.

Essentially, it uses machine learning as a filter to separate bad traffic from benign and to characterize network traffic behavior. It also uses a process including context enrichment, noise filtering, whitelisting and heuristics to produce a shortlist of most likely security threats.

By providing common open data models for network, endpoint, and user, meanwhile, Spot makes it easier to integrate cross-application data for better enterprise visibility and new analytic functionality. Those open data models also make it easier for organizations to share analytics as new threats are discovered.

Other contributors to the project so far include eBay, Webroot, Jask, Cybraics, Cloudwick, and Endgame.

“The open source community is the perfect environment for Apache Spot to take a collective, peer-driven approach to fighting cybercrime,” said Ron Kasabian, vice president and general manager for Intel's Analytics and Artificial Intelligence Solutions Group. “The combined expertise of contributors will help further Apache Spot’s open data model vision and provide the grounds for collaboration on the world’s toughest and constantly evolving challenges in cybersecurity analytics.”