Roundup

J003-Content-3rdPartyRoundup_SQAutumn season brings falling leaves and a new set patches, with an unusually large security patch bunch coming from Apple, and a regular monthly number of patches from other vendors.

Autumn is in the air, the trees are displaying their finest fall colors, the weather is getting cooler, and many of us are already getting psyched up for the holidays ahead. The seasons change, but in the IT industry there’s one constant: pumpkin patches won’t be the only kind of patches we’ll be dealing with as we head into this time of the year.

While we’re in the produce section of the grocery store, try not to upset the Apple cart because you might get buried under the large number of security updates that have been released for iProducts this month. We’re used to seeing only perhaps five or six actual updates, although often one will contain fixes for fifty or more vulnerabilities. This time, Apple has put out a whopping thirteen security patches as of this writing on September 28th.

Other vendors had more typical numbers of patch releases.

Apple released only two patches in August, so I guess they’re making up for that – with a vengeance – this time. The Safari web browser was updated twice, and the iOS mobile operating system got three updates in fewer than thirty days.

On September 1, Apple released two patches:

  • Security update 2016-001 for OS X El Capitan and 2016-005 for OS X Yosemite. These update for the Mac OS X operating system address two kernel vulnerabilities, one of which could be exploited to disclose kernel memory and the other to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges.
  • Safari 9.1.3 for OS X Mavericks and Yosemite. This update patches a memory corruption vulnerability that could be exploited to allow a malicious web site to execute arbitrary code.

On September 13, Apple released six patches:

  • iOS 10 for iPhone 5 and above, iPad 4th gen and above, iPod Touch 6th gen and above. This update addresses 49 separate vulnerabilities in the mobile operating system, in components including the kernel, WebKit, Safari Reader, S2 Camera, Messages, Printing UIKit, Mail, GeoServices, FontParser, CoreCrypto, Audio, and more. It also updates the certificate trust policy.
  • iOS 10.0.1 for iPhone 5 and above, iPad 4th gen and above, iPod Touch 6th gen and above. This update, released the same day as the above, addresses a single validation issue that could allow an application to disclose kernel memory.
  • Xcode 8 for OS X Capitan and later. This update also addresses a single validation issue that could allow an application to disclose kernel memory.
  • watchOS 3, all models. This update addresses nineteen vulnerabilities in Apple’s smart watch operating system, which include memory corruption, input validation, memory disclosure, arbitrary code execution and other issues. Many of these are the same issues addressed in the updates for iOS and OS X.
  • tvOS 10 for Apple TV 4th This update addresses twenty-nine vulnerabilities in the operating system software for the Apple TV media device, which include many of the same issues addressed in the updates for iOS and OS X.
  • iTunes 12.5.1 for Windows 7 and above. This update address eleven vulnerabilities in the WebKit component of the iTunes application for Windows, which include parsing and permissions issues, multiple memory corruption issues, a cross-protocol exploitation of non-HTTP services vulnerability, and a certificate validation issue.
  • macOS Sierra 10.12 for OS X El Capitan. This update addresses sixty-five vulnerabilities in various components of Apple’s latest desktop and server operating system, macOS Sierra. (macOS was previously OS X; Apple changed the name to correspond more closely to iOS). The vulnerabilities exist in many components, including apache, the Application Firewall, audio, Bluetooth, crypto and display components, FontParser, the Intel graphics driver, Kerberos, the kernel, S2 Camera, security components, Terminal, WindowServer and more. The vulnerabilities include type confusion, information disclosure, arbitrary code execution, bypass of protection mechanisms, memory corruption, out-of-bounds read issues, denial of service vulnerability, user account vulnerability, a spoofing issue, session management issues, input validation issues, and more.
  • Safari 10 for OS X Yosemite, OS X El Capitan and macOS Sierra. This update addresses twenty-one vulnerabilities in the Safari web browser, which include multiple memory corruption issues, certificate validation vulnerability, cross-protocol exploitation of non-HTTP services, permissions issues, a parsing issue, a state management issue and more in Safari Reader, Safari Tabs and WebKit components.
  • macOS Server 5.2 for macOS Sierra. This update addresses a pair of vulnerabilities in apache and ServerDocs Server components that include an issue in the handling of the HTTP_PROXY environment variable that could allow an attacker to proxy traffic through an arbitrary server and an RC4 cryptographic weakness.
  • iCloud for Windows v6 for Windows 7 and above. This update addresses a single memory corruption vulnerability in the WebKit component of Apple’s iCloud application for Windows that could be exploited to accomplish arbitrary code execution.
  • iOS 10.0.2 for iPhone 5 and above, iPad 4th gen and above, and iPod Touch 6th gen and above. This update for Apple’s mobile operating system includes the security content from iOS 10.0.1.

For more information about this and the previously issued patches and the vulnerabilities that they address, see the Apple Support web site at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222

Adobe released only one update in August, so we might have expected a deluge this time – but instead we got a pretty typical three patches, all of them originally released on their normal Patch Tuesday schedule, which this month fell on September 13.

  • APSB16-28. This is an update for Adobe Digital Editions for Windows, Mac OS, iOS and Android. Digital Editions (ADE) is Adobe’s ebook reader software. The update addresses seven memory corruption issues and a use-after-free vulnerability, all of which could be exploited to accomplish code execution. The rating is critical.
  • APSB16-29. This is an update for Adobe Flash Player for Windows, Mac OS, Linux and ChromeOS. It addresses twenty-six vulnerabilities including integer overflow, use-after-free, security bypass, and memory corruption issues. Impacts include code execution and information disclosure and the rating is critical.
  • APSB16-31. This is an update for Adobe AIR SDK and Compiler on Windows and Mac OS, which addresses a single vulnerability and adds support for secure transmission of runtime analytics for AIR applications on Android.

For more information about these vulnerabilities and updates, see Adobe’s Security Bulletins and Advisories web site at https://helpx.adobe.com/security.html or see the individual bulletins linked in each bullet point above.

On September 13th, Google released a security update for the Chrome web browser on Windows, Mac and Linux desktop operating systems that address multiple vulnerabilities. These include two use-after-free issues in Blink, an arbitrary memory read in v8, an extension resource access issue, a popup not correctly suppressed, and a SafeBrowsing bypass issue.

For more information, see the Google Chrome Releases blog at http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com

Oracle normally releases security updates on a quarterly cycle, in January, April, July and October, so the next regularly scheduled patch release will occur on October 18.

Mozilla released Firefox v49 on September 20th, which contains four critical security fixes, ten rated as high severity, two rated with moderate severity and two rated low, for a total of eighteen vulnerabilities addressed.

  • Buffer overflow when working with empty filters during canvas rendering – critical
  • Potentially exploitable crash caused by buffer overflow when encoding image frames – critical
  • Memory corruption issues – critical
  • More memory corruption issues – critical
  • Heap buffer overflow – high
  • Bad cast when processing layout with input elements – high
  • Potentially exploitable crash in accessibility – high
  • Use-after-free vulnerability triggered by aria-owns attribute – high
  • Use-after-free vulnerability in web animations during restyling – high
  • Use-after-free vulnerability in web animation when destroying timeline – high
  • Use-after-free when changing text direction – high
  • Use-after-free when manipulating SVG content through script – high
  • Timing attack vulnerability using iframes – high
  • Add-on update site certification pin expiration – high
  • Full path to local files available to scripts – moderate
  • Favicons can be loaded through non-whitelisted protocols – moderate
  • Content security policy containing referrer directive with no values can cause crash – low
  • Out-of-bounds read during processing of text runs – low

For more information about those vulnerabilities and fixes, and to check for new version releases, see Mozilla’s web site at https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox/

Popular Linux distros, as usual, have seen a number of security advisories and updates this month. As of the date of this writing (September 28), Ubuntu has issued twenty-eight security notices this month, which is fewer than usual. Many of these address multiple vulnerabilities and in some cases there are multiple advisories for the same vulnerabilities. Other commercial Linux vendors issued a similar number of updates. Here are the Ubuntu security advisories for September:

  • USN-3093-1: ClamAV vulnerabilities – 28th September 2016. It was discovered that ClamAV incorrectly handled certain malformed files. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause ClamAV to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. In the default installation, attackers would be isolated by the ClamAV AppArmor profile.
  • USN-3092-1: Samba vulnerability – 28th September 2016. Stefan Metzmacher discovered that Samba incorrectly handled certain flags in SMB2/3 client connections. A remote attacker could use this issue to disable client signing and impersonate servers by performing a man in the middle attack. Samba has been updated to 4.3.11 in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.
  • USN-3090-1: Pillow vulnerabilities – 27th September 2016. It was discovered that a flaw in processing a compressed text chunk in a PNG image could cause the image to have a large size when decompressed, potentially leading to a denial of service.
  • USN-3088-1: Bind vulnerability – 27th September 2016. It was discovered that Bind incorrectly handled building responses to certain specially crafted requests. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause Bind to crash, resulting in a denial of service.
  • USN-3089-1: Django vulnerability – 27th September 2016. Sergey Bobrov discovered that Django incorrectly parsed cookies when being used with Google Analytics. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to set arbitrary cookies leading to a CSRF protection bypass.
  • USN-3087-2: OpenSSL regression – 23rd September 2016. USN-3087-1 fixed vulnerabilities in OpenSSL. The fix for CVE-2016-2182 was incomplete and caused a regression when parsing certificates. This update fixes the problem.
  • USN-3087-1: OpenSSL vulnerabilities – 22nd September 2016. Shi Lei discovered that OpenSSL incorrectly handled the OCSP Status Request extension. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause memory consumption, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2016-6304) Guido Vranken discovered that OpenSSL used undefined behaviour when performing pointer arithmetic.
  • USN-3073-1: Thunderbird vulnerabilities – 22nd September 2016. Christian Holler, Carsten Book, Gary Kwong, Jesse Ruderman, Andrew McCreight, and Phil Ringnalda discovered multiple memory safety issues in Thunderbird. If a user were tricked in to opening a specially crafted message, an attacker could potentially exploit these to cause a denial of service via application crash, or execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3076-1: Firefox vulnerabilities – 22nd September 2016. Atte Kettunen discovered an out-of-bounds read when handling certain Content Security Policy (CSP) directives in some circumstances. If a user were tricked in to opening a specially crafted website, an attacker could potentially exploit this to cause a denial of service via application crash.
  • USN-3085-1: GDK-PixBuf vulnerabilities – 21st September 2016. It was discovered that the GDK-PixBuf library did not properly handle specially crafted bmp images, leading to a heap-based buffer overflow. If a user or automated system were tricked into opening a specially crafted bmp file, a remote attacker could use this flaw to cause GDK-PixBuf to crash.
  • USN-3086-1: Irssi vulnerabilities – 21st September 2016. Gabriel Campana and Adrien Guinet discovered that the format parsing code in Irssi did not properly verify 24bit color codes. A remote attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (application crash).
  • USN-3084-4: Linux kernel (Qualcomm Snapdragon) vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. Pengfei Wang discovered a race condition in the audit subsystem in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to corrupt audit logs or disrupt system-call auditing.
  • USN-3084-3: Linux kernel (Raspberry Pi 2) vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. Pengfei Wang discovered a race condition in the audit subsystem in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to corrupt audit logs or disrupt system-call auditing.
  • USN-3084-2: Linux kernel (Xenial HWE) vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. USN-3084-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Pengfei Wang discovered a race condition in the audit subsystem in the Linux kernel.
  • USN-3084-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. Pengfei Wang discovered a race condition in the audit subsystem in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to corrupt audit logs or disrupt system-call auditing.
  • USN-3083-2: Linux kernel (Trusty HWE) vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. USN-3083-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. Dmitry Vyukov discovered that the IPv6 implementation in the Linux kernel did not properly handle options data.
  • USN-3083-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 19th September 2016. Dmitry Vyukov discovered that the IPv6 implementation in the Linux kernel did not properly handle options data, including a use-after-free. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3082-2: Linux kernel (OMAP4) vulnerability – 19th September 2016. Chiachih Wu, Yuan-Tsung Lo, and Xuxian Jiang discovered that the legacy ABI for ARM (OABI) had incomplete access checks for epoll_wait(2) and semtimedop(2). A local attacker could use this to possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3082-1: Linux kernel vulnerability – 19th September 2016. Chiachih Wu, Yuan-Tsung Lo, and Xuxian Jiang discovered that the legacy ABI for ARM (OABI) had incomplete access checks for epoll_wait(2) and semtimedop(2). A local attacker could use this to possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3081-1: Tomcat vulnerability – 19th September 2016. Dawid Golunski discovered that the Tomcat init script incorrectly handled creating log files. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to obtain root privileges. (CVE-2016-1240) This update also reverts a change in behaviour introduced in USN-3024-1 by setting mapperContextRootRedirectEnabled to True by default.
  • USN-3080-1: Python Imaging Library vulnerabilities – 15th September 2016. Eric Soroos discovered that the Python Imaging Library incorrectly handled certain malformed FLI or PhotoCD files. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause Python Imaging Library to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2016-0775, CVE-2016-2533) Andrew Drake discovered that the Python Imaging Libray incorrectly validated input.
  • USN-3058-1: Oxide vulnerabilities – 14th September 2016. An issue was discovered in Blink involving the provisional URL for an initially empty document. An attacker could potentially exploit this to spoof the currently displayed URL. (CVE-2016-5141) A use-after-free was discovered in the WebCrypto implementation in Blink.
  • USN-3079-1: WebKitGTK+ vulnerabilities – 14th September 2016. A large number of security issues were discovered in the WebKitGTK+ Web and JavaScript engines. If a user were tricked into viewing a malicious website, a remote attacker could exploit a variety of issues related to web browser security, including cross-site scripting attacks, denial of service attacks, and arbitrary code execution.
  • USN-3078-1: MySQL vulnerability – 13th September 2016. Dawid Golunski discovered that MySQL incorrectly handled configuration files. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to execute arbitrary code with root privileges. MySQL has been updated to 5.5.52 in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS has been updated to MySQL 5.7.15.
  • USN-3077-1: OpenJDK 6 vulnerabilities – 12th September 2016. A vulnerability was discovered in the OpenJDK JRE related to data integrity. An attacker could exploit this to expose sensitive data over the network or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2016-3458) Multiple vulnerabilities were discovered in the OpenJDK JRE related to availability.
  • USN-3075-1: Imlib2 vulnerabilities – 8th September 2016. Jakub Wilk discovered an out of bounds read in the GIF loader implementation in Imlib2. An attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (application crash) or possibly obtain sensitive information. (CVE-2016-3994) Yuriy M. Kaminskiy discovered an off-by-one error when handling coordinates in Imlib2.
  • USN-3074-1: File Roller vulnerability – 8th September 2016. It was discovered that File Roller incorrectly handled symlinks. If a user were tricked into extracting a specially-crafted archive, an attacker could delete files outside of the extraction directory.

For more information about any of these patches, visit the Ubuntu web site at http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/

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GFI Blog

J003-Content-3rdPartyRoundup_SQIT pros who are looking for relief from the heavy patch loads we’ve seen recently will find August is a mixed bag. Firefox 48 is here now, along with a bunch of security updates from other vendors.

Summer is drawing to an end and soon fall will be in the air. For those of us in hot climates, this time of the year always comes as a relief. IT pros who are looking for relief from the heavy patch loads we’ve seen recently will find August is a mixed bag.

Apple is following the light month/heavy month alternating schedule that has been the norm lately and only gives us two, Adobe released only a single security update this month, but Mozilla is making up for it with Firefox 48, which includes twenty-three security fixes. For Google and Linux, it’s business as usual.

Now let’s take a look at the details of some of this month’s patches from major third party security vendors. The following applies as of the date of this writing, which is August 29.

Apple

After a large number of patches in May, Apple released only one in June. In July, they had seven patches for us, addressing a few large number of vulnerabilities, and this month we’re back to “light” again with only two. Both are new versions of iOS for the iPhone 4s and above, iPad 2 and above, and iPod Touch fifth generation and later.

  • On August 4, Apple released iOS version 9.3.4 to address a single memory corruption vulnerability in IOMobileFrameBuffer, which could be exploited to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges.
  • On August 25, Apple released iOS version 9.3.5, which addresses three separate vulnerabilities that include a validation issue that could allow disclosure of kernel memory, a memory corruption issue that could be used to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges, and a memory corruption issue in the WebKit component that could lead to arbitrary code execution.

For more information about this and the previously issued patches and the vulnerabilities that they address, see the Apple Support web site at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222

Adobe

Adobe had an average month in July, with the issuance of three security updates. For August, they have released only one update.

  • APSB16-27 was released on August 9 in keeping with Adobe’s standard Patch Tuesday schedule, containing hotfixes for four vulnerabilities in Adobe Experience Manager. These include two input validation issues that could be used for cross-scripting attacks, an information disclosure vulnerability in backup functionality, and a vulnerability that could result in disclosure of audit log events to unprivileged users. These affect Windows, UNIX, Linux and OS X, are all rated important, and have a priority rating of 2.

For more information about these vulnerabilities and updates, see Adobe’s Security Bulletins and Advisories web site at https://helpx.adobe.com/security.html

Google

Google’s August Security Bulletin for Android contains security patch level 2016-08-01 that addresses twenty-two vulnerabilities, one critical, four high-severity and the rest moderate, along with patch level 2016-08-05, which addresses an additional eighty-one vulnerabilities. These include remote code execution, elevation of privilege, information disclosure and denial of service issues. For more information about the details, see the bulletin at https://source.android.com/security/bulletin/2016-08-01.html

Google also released a stable channel update for Chrome OS on August 3, which contains a fix for a heap overflow vulnerability of high severity. Also on August 3, Google released a stable channel update for the Chrome desktop browser for Windows, Mac and Linux that includes ten security fixes, four of which are of high severity. For more information, see the Google Chrome Releases blog at http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com

Oracle

Oracle normally releases security updates on a quarterly cycle, in January, April, July and October, so the next regularly scheduled patch release will occur on October 18.

Mozilla

Mozilla released no security updates for Firefox last month, but they made up for it this month, with twenty-three security patches in Firefox v. 48, which was released on August 2.

  • 2016-84 Information disclosure through Resource Timing API during page navigation
  • 2016-83 Spoofing attack through text injection into internal error pages
  • 2016-82 Addressbar spoofing with right-to-left characters on Firefox for Android
  • 2016-81 Information disclosure and local file manipulation through drag and drop
  • 2016-80 Same-origin policy violation using local HTML file and saved shortcut file
  • 2016-79 Use-after-free when applying SVG effects
  • 2016-78 Type confusion in display transformation>
  • 2016-77 Buffer overflow in ClearKey Content Decryption Module (CDM) during video playback
  • 2016-76 Scripts on marquee tag can execute in sandboxed iframes
  • 2016-75 Integer overflow in WebSockets during data buffering
  • 2016-74 Form input type change from password to text can store plain text password in session restore file
  • 2016-73 Use-after-free in service workers with nested sync events
  • 2016-72 Use-after-free in DTLS during WebRTC session shutdown
  • 2016-71 Crash in incremental garbage collection in JavaScript
  • 2016-70 Use-after-free when using alt key and toplevel menus
  • 2016-69 Arbitrary file manipulation by local user through Mozilla updater and callback application path parameter
  • 2016-68 Out-of-bounds read during XML parsing in Expat library
  • 2016-67 Stack underflow during 2D graphics rendering
  • 2016-66 Location bar spoofing via data URLs with malformed/invalid mediatypes
  • 2016-65 Cairo rendering crash due to memory allocation issue with FFmpeg 0.10
  • 2016-64 Buffer overflow rendering SVG with bidirectional content
  • 2016-63 Favicon network connection can persist when page is closed
  • 2016-62 Miscellaneous memory safety hazards (rv:48.0 / rv:45.3)

For more information about those vulnerabilities and fixes, and to check for new version releases, see Mozilla’s web site at https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox/

Linux

Popular Linux distros, as usual, have seen a number of security advisories and updates this month. As of the date of this writing (August 29), Ubuntu has issued 32 security notices this month. Many of these address multiple vulnerabilities and in some cases there are multiple advisories for the same vulnerabilities. Other commercial Linux vendors issued a similar number of updates. Here are the Ubuntu Security Notices (USNs) for August:

  • USN-3072-2: Linux kernel (OMAP4) vulnerabilities – 29th August 2016. Kangjie Lu discovered an information leak in the Reliable Datagram Sockets (RDS) implementation in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to obtain potentially sensitive information from kernel memory.
  • USN-3072-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 29th August 2016. Kangjie Lu discovered an information leak in the Reliable Datagram Sockets (RDS) implementation in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to obtain potentially sensitive information from kernel memory.
  • USN-3071-2: Linux kernel (Trusty HWE) vulnerabilities – 29th August 2016. USN-3071-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
  • USN-3071-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 29th August 2016. Kangjie Lu discovered an information leak in the Reliable Datagram Sockets (RDS) implementation in the Linux kernel. A local attacker could use this to obtain potentially sensitive information from kernel memory.
  • USN-3070-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 29th August 2016. A missing permission check when settings ACLs was discovered in nfsd. A local user could exploit this flaw to gain access to any file by setting an ACL.
  • USN-3069-1: Eye of GNOME vulnerability – 25th August 2016. It was discovered that Eye of GNOME incorrectly handled certain invalid UTF-8 strings. If a user were tricked into opening a specially-crafted image, a remote attacker could use this issue to cause Eye of GNOME to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3067-1: HarfBuzz vulnerabilities – 24th August 2016. Kostya Serebryany discovered that HarfBuzz incorrectly handled memory. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause HarfBuzz to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. (CVE-2015-8947) It was discovered that HarfBuzz incorrectly handled certain length checks.
  • USN-3068-1: Libidn vulnerabilities – 24th August 2016. Thijs Alkemade, Gustavo Grieco, Daniel Stenberg, and Nikos Mavrogiannopoulos discovered that Libidn incorrectly handled invalid UTF-8 characters. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause Libidn to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly disclose sensitive memory.
  • USN-3066-1: PostgreSQL vulnerabilities – 18th August 2016. Heikki Linnakangas discovered that PostgreSQL incorrectly handled certain nested CASE/WHEN expressions. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause PostgreSQL to crash, resulting in a denial of service. (CVE-2016-5423) Nathan Bossart discovered that PostgreSQL incorrectly handled special characters in database and role names.
  • USN-3065-1: Libgcrypt vulnerability – 18th August 2016. Felix Dörre and Vladimir Klebanov discovered that Libgcrypt incorrectly handled mixing functions in the random number generator. An attacker able to obtain 4640 bits from the RNG can trivially predict the next 160 bits of output.
  • USN-3064-1: GnuPG vulnerability – 18th August 2016. Felix Dörre and Vladimir Klebanov discovered that GnuPG incorrectly handled mixing functions in the random number generator. An attacker able to obtain 4640 bits from the RNG can trivially predict the next 160 bits of output.
  • USN-3063-1: Fontconfig vulnerability – 17th August 2016. Tobias Stoeckmann discovered that Fontconfig incorrectly handled cache files. A local attacker could possibly use this issue with a specially crafted cache file to elevate privileges.
  • USN-3062-1: OpenJDK 7 vulnerabilities – 16th August 2016. Multiple vulnerabilities were discovered in the OpenJDK JRE related to information disclosure, data integrity, and availability. An attacker could exploit these to cause a denial of service, expose sensitive data over the network, or possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3061-1: OpenSSH vulnerabilities – 15th August 2016. Eddie Harari discovered that OpenSSH incorrectly handled password hashing when authenticating non-existing users. A remote attacker could perform a timing attack and enumerate valid users.
  • USN-3047-2: QEMU regression – 12th August 2016. USN-3047-1 fixed vulnerabilities in QEMU. The patch to fix CVE-2016-5403 caused a regression which resulted in save/restore failures when virtio memory balloon statistics are enabled. This update temporarily reverts the security fix for CVE-2016-5403 pending further investigation. We apologize for the inconvenience.
  • USN-3060-1: GD library vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. It was discovered that the GD library incorrectly handled certain malformed TGA images. If a user or automated system were tricked into processing a specially crafted TGA image, an attacker could cause a denial of service.
  • USN-3059-1: xmlrpc-epi vulnerability – 10th August 2016. It was discovered that xmlrpc-epi incorrectly handled lengths in the simplestring_addn function. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause applications using xmlrpc-epi such as PHP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3057-1: Linux kernel (Qualcomm Snapdragon) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered an integer overflow in the Linux netfilter implementation. On systems running 32 bit kernels, a local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3056-1: Linux kernel (Raspberry Pi 2) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered an integer overflow in the Linux netfilter implementation. On systems running 32 bit kernels, a local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3055-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered an integer overflow in the Linux netfilter implementation. On systems running 32 bit kernels, a local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3054-1: Linux kernel (Xenial HWE) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered an integer overflow in the Linux netfilter implementation. On systems running 32 bit kernels, a local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3053-1: Linux kernel (Vivid HWE) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. A missing permission check when settings ACLs was discovered in nfsd. A local user could exploit this flaw to gain access to any file by setting an ACL.
  • USN-3052-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. It was discovered that the keyring implementation in the Linux kernel did not ensure a data structure was initialized before referencing it after an error condition occurred. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).
  • USN-3051-1: Linux kernel (Trusty HWE) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. It was discovered that the keyring implementation in the Linux kernel did not ensure a data structure was initialized before referencing it after an error condition occurred. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).
  • USN-3050-1: Linux kernel (OMAP4) vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered that the Linux netfilter implementation did not correctly perform validation when handling IPT_SO_SET_REPLACE events. A local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3049-1: Linux kernel vulnerabilities – 10th August 2016. Ben Hawkes discovered that the Linux netfilter implementation did not correctly perform validation when handling IPT_SO_SET_REPLACE events. A local unprivileged attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code with administrative privileges.
  • USN-3048-1: curl vulnerabilities – 8th August 2016. Bru Rom discovered that curl incorrectly handled client certificates when resuming a TLS session. (CVE-2016-5419) It was discovered that curl incorrectly handled client certificates when reusing TLS connections. (CVE-2016-5420) Marcelo Echeverria and Fernando Muñoz discovered that curl incorrectly reused a connection struct, contrary to expectations.
  • USN-3041-1: Oxide vulnerabilities – 5th August 2016. Multiple security issues were discovered in Chromium. If a user were tricked in to opening a specially crafted website, an attacker could potentially exploit these to read uninitialized memory, cause a denial of service (application crash) or execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3044-1: Firefox vulnerabilities – 5th August 2016. Gustavo Grieco discovered an out-of-bounds read during XML parsing in some circumstances. If a user were tricked in to opening a specially crafted website, an attacker could potentially exploit this to cause a denial of service via application crash, or obtain sensitive information.
  • USN-3047-1: QEMU vulnerabilities – 4th August 2016. Li Qiang discovered that QEMU incorrectly handled 53C9X Fast SCSI controller emulation. A privileged attacker inside the guest could use this issue to cause QEMU to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code on the host.
  • USN-3046-1: LibreOffice vulnerability – 4th August 2016. Yves Younan and Richard Johnson discovered that LibreOffice incorrectly handled presentation files. If a user were tricked into opening a specially crafted presentation file, a remote attacker could cause LibreOffice to crash, and possibly execute arbitrary code.
  • USN-3045-1: PHP vulnerabilities – 2nd August 2016. It was discovered that PHP incorrectly handled certain SplMinHeap::compare operations. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause PHP to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.

For more information about these, see the Ubuntu web site at http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/

You may also like:

  • Third Party Patch Roundup – July 2016
  • July 2016 – Microsoft Patch Tuesday
  • Quarterly updates for Exchange are out – Q2 2016


GFI Blog

At an earlier point in my career, I used to read a lot of technical security books. From 2006 to 2012 I published a series of Best Book Bejtlich Read posts. Beginning in 2013 I became much more interested in military-derived strategy and history, dating back to my studies at the Air Force Academy in the early 1990s. I stopped reviewing books at Amazon.com and didn't talk about my reading.

Last week I read Every Book I Read in 2015 by T. Greer, which inspired me to write my own version of that post. I have records for 2014-2015 thanks to a list I keep at Amazon.com. I'm modifying Greer's approach by not including personal reading, but I am adopting his idea to bold those titles that were my favorites.

The following are presented such that the most recently read appears first.

2015 Reading (37 books):

Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy 
by Barry R. Posen *(I'm joining the "restraint" school. I will say more about this in 2016.)

Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurge​ncy Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam
by John A. Nagl

On Guerrilla Warfare
by Mao Tse-tung

The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy
by Edward N. Luttwak *(I became a Luttwak fan when I read his book on Rome in 2014. Although I don't agree with everything he writes -- such as his stance on humanitarian assistance -- I find his "logic of strategy" compelling and correct.)

The Dragon Extends its Reach: Chinese Military Power Goes Global
by Larry M. Wortzel

War and Politics
by Bernard Brodie *(I became a huge Brodie fan in 2015, and this book was just as good as the first Brodie book I read, listed below.)

Strategy: Second Revised Edition
by B. H. Liddell Hart

Science, Strategy and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd
by Frans P.B. Osinga

The U.S.-China Military Scorecard: Forces, Geography, and the Evolving Balance of Power, 1996-2017
by Eric Heginbotham, Michael Nixon, Forrest E. Morgan

Strategy in the Missile Age
by Bernard Brodie *(This book made me a Brodie fan. I like his clear reasoning and writing style.)

Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace, Revised and Enlarged Edition
by Edward N. Luttwak *(Despite how much I like Brodie's work, this is probably my "book of the year." It gave a voice to many of the frustrations with the way my technical- and tactics-obsessed colleagues in the digital security world approach offense and defense. Introducing the "technical" level of war (below tactics) and the "classic delusion of the 'final move'" described well what happens in traditional digital security practice and thought.)

Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War
by Robert Coram

In Pursuit of Military Excellence: The Evolution of Operational Theory
by Shimon Naveh

The Grey Line: Modern Corporate Espionage and Counter Intelligence
by Andrew Brown *(This book wins the "weirdest book of the year" award. The author makes outrageous claims, with no sourcing, but seems to know what he is talking about.)

Broker, Trader, Lawyer, Spy: The Secret World of Corporate Espionage
by Eamon Javers

The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future
by David J. Lonsdale

Cyberspace and the State: Toward a strategy for cyber-power
by David J Betz, Tim Stevens

Grant's Last Battle: The Story Behind the Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant
by Chris Mackowski

There Will Be Cyberwar: How The Move To Network-Centri​c Warfighting Has Set The Stage For Cyberwar
by Richard Stiennon

The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones Confron​ting A New Age of Threat
by Benjamin Wittes, Gabriella Blum *(This book offered valuable insights, including How The World Butchered Benjamin Franklin’s Quote On Liberty Vs. Security.)

Future Crimes: Everything Is Connected, Everyone Is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It
by Marc Goodman *(This book was surprisingly good. After I read past the "cyber" parts, I found myself thinking differently about "connectivity" and its effects.)

Cyber Policy in China
by Greg Austin

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World
by Bruce Schneier *(I like that, after documenting privacy concerns caused by public and private actors, Bruce tells the reader to work through the democratic process to reform the system -- not become anarchists.)

Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S.-China Relations in the Twenty-First Century
by James Steinberg, Michael E. O`Hanlon *(The first book in the "restraint" school I read in 2015.)

@War: The Rise of the Military-Inter​net Complex
by Shane Harris *(I was surprised by the amount of backroom information the author obtained. Fascinating insights.)

Spam Nation: The Inside Story of Organized Cybercrime-fro​m Global Epidemic to Your Front Door
by Brian Krebs *(So much more than spam! Must-read.)

Cyber War versus Cyber Realities: Cyber Conflict in the International System
by Brandon Valeriano, Ryan C. Maness *(I disagree with a lot of this book, but I appreciate this sort of research.)

Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon
by Kim Zetter *(I thought the story of Stuxnet was already well-documented, but this was a great book -- especially during the finalization of the Iran nuclear deal.)

The Barefoot Lawyer: A Blind Man's Fight for Justice and Freedom in China
by Chen Guangcheng *(I was so pleased to testify with the Barefoot Lawyer himself last year -- awesome experience!)

War
by Lawrence Freedman

Competitive Strategies for the 21st Century: Theory, History, and Practice
by Thomas Mahnken

Computer Capers
by Thomas Whiteside

China and Cybersecurity: Espionage, Strategy, and Politics in the Digital Domain
by Jon R. Lindsay, Tai Ming Cheung, Derek S. Reveron

On War
by Carl von Clausewitz, Michael Eliot Howard, Peter Paret

Strategy: A History
by Lawrence Freedman

U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues: Volume II - National Security Policy and Strategy (5th Edition)
by U.S. Army War College

U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues- Volume I: Theory of War and Strategy (5th Edition)
by U.S. Army War College

Talking another page from Greer, if I were to add entries to my quantum library, they would include the books by Brodie, Luttwak's Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace. I would probably also have to add Clausewitz, if only because everyone in the strategy world obsesses about him.

2014 Reading (24 books):

Forged in Fire: Strategy and Decisions in the Airwar over Europe 1940-1945
by Dewitt S. Copp

A Few Great Captains: The Men and Events That Shaped the Development of U.S. Air Power
by Dewitt S. Copp *(The title of this book was derived from one of my favorite quotes: "No army produces more than a few great captains." Army Chief of Staff Gen George Marshall, eulogizing airman Lt Gen Frank Andrews in 1943.)

The Rise of American Air Power: The Creation of Armageddon
by Michael S. Sherry *(This book made a powerful case that airpower was promoted as a less violent way to win wars, in comparison to the slaughter of World War I. Unfortunately, during World War II, it became probably more violent, demonstrated by the firebombing of Germany and Japan.)

The Icarus Syndrome: The Role of Air Power Theory in the Evolution and Fate of the U.S. Air Force
by Carl H. Builder *(This book helped me understand how and why pilots think as they do, and why a separate Cyber Force is likely necessary, from a personnel standpoint alone.)

Airpower for Strategic Effect
by Colin S. Gray *(Gray is a prolific author, but with this book I decided to no longer read his works. His style is difficult for me to follow.)

The American Way of War: A History of United States Military Strategy and Policy
by Russell F. Weigley

Command in War
by Martin Van Creveld

The Masks of War: American Military Styles in Strategy and Analysis: A RAND Corporation Research Study
by Carl Builder *(Builder writes with penetrating insight regarding how military services see each other.)

American Cold War Strategy: Interpreting NSC 68
by Ernest R. May *(NSC 68 is like Clausewitz -- you have to be conversant with it!)

The Wizards of Armageddon 
by Fred Kaplan *(This book introduced me to Brodie and the other early nuclear strategists. I extracted some excellent lessons from my PhD from it, especially concerning the early Air Force's inability to physically execute the aircraft operations it said it could perform to provide retaliatory options. It reminded me of Libicki's erroneous belief that cyber security vulnerability is the victim's choice.)

History and Strategy
by Marc Trachtenberg

Strategy in the Contemporary World
by John Baylis, James J. Wirtz, Colin S. Gray *(Yes, I read a no-kidding text book.)

The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire: From the First Century A.D. to the Third
by Edward N. Luttwak *(This book sold me on Luttwak, but I hadn't read about his "logic" yet.)

Historians' Fallacies : Toward a Logic of Historical Thought
by David Hackett Fischer *(This is the sort of book that one can leverage to demolish almost everything you encounter when reading history. It's worth reading several times and I intend to try to avoid the fallacies in my PhD.)

Addressing Cyber Instability
by Cyber Conflict Studies Association

Authoring a PhD Thesis: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Finish a Doctoral Dissertation
by Patrick Dunleavy *(This is a must-read if you are pursuing the "big-book" thesis as found in the British system, as is my situation.)

The Air Campaign
by John Warden III *(I am a big fan of Boyd, Warden, and Deptula and try to read whatever they write.)

Alien: How Operational Art Devoured Strategy
by Justin Kelly, Mike Brennan *(I read this book to be familiar with arguments by those who oppose the utility of an operational level of war, between strategy and tactics.)

The Sources of Military Doctrine: France, Britain, and Germany Between the World Wars
by Barry R. Posen *(I believe Ian Wallace recommended this book. I thought it was great. I already listed Dr Posen's "restraint" work, which I read much later.)

The Air Campaign, John Warden and Classical Airpower Theorists (Revised Edition)
by David R. Mets

Strategic Stability
by Elbridge Colby *(This was some difficult early reading, before I identified my core interests. The concept of "stability" was helpful when I read later works, however.)

Treasury's War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare
by Juan Zarate *(This is an excellent book that documents another major operational mode for US power in the 21st century.)

Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know
by P.W. Singer, Allan Friedman

John Warden and the Renaissance of American Air Power
by John Andreas Olsen

The only book to make the "quantum" list, from my 2014 reading, would be Fischer's Historians' Fallacies.

I read a ton of papers and studies in 2014-2015, but these are the books I tracked. I regret that my 2013 reading appears to have disappeared into history. I know that I read Cyber War Will Not Take Place but otherwise I have no concrete records of professional reading in 2013. It was a very busy year with the APT1 report and the FireEye acquisition of Mandiant, so perhaps I didn't read that much.

In any case, I hope you find this list useful and perhaps inspiring, should you share the same sorts of interests, or if you are wondering how to get started in the military, or at least non-business, strategy world.


TaoSecurity

J003-Content-3rdPartyRoundup_SQAs we wrap up this month and head into August, summer is more than halfway gone. It’s been a long, hot one here in Texas and in many other areas of the U.S. and the world, so we’re all looking forward to a little relief in the not-too-distant future.

In the IT world, we would also appreciate some relief from the never-ending flood of new vulnerabilities and exploits and the need to apply patches to fix the issues. Unfortunately, hunting for new ways to get into networks and steal data or take down systems is not a seasonal activity; the bad guys are always hard at work trying to circumvent security mechanisms that are built into our software. That means there’s no rest for the weary IT pro.

Now let’s take a look at the details of some of this month’s patches from major third party security vendors. The following applies as of the date of this writing, which is June 28.

Apple

Apple seems to be on a light/heavy schedule. After a large number of patches in May, they released only one in June. That means we were expecting another deluge this month, and we got it: seven patches spanning their desktop, mobile, watch and TV operating systems as well as the iCloud, iTunes and Safari products.

All of the following were released on July 18:

  • OS X El Capitan v10.11.6 and Security Update 2016-004 – addresses more than 60 different vulnerabilities in various operating system components, including the OS kernel, graphics drivers and components, audio components, FaceTime, QuickTime, Apache, OpenSSL, and more. The most serious of these can be exploited to accomplish remote code execution.
  • iOS 9.3.3 – addresses more than 40 different vulnerabilities in various operating system components, including the Kernel, as well as in Calendar, CoreGraphics, FaceTime, Safari, Siri Contacts, Sandbox Profiles, WebKit and more. The most serious of these can be exploited to accomplish remote code execution.
  • watchOS 2.2.2 – addresses more than 20 vulnerabilities in various operating system components, including the OS kernel, graphics components, Sandbox Profiles and more. Impacts include information disclosure, remote denial of service attack, and the most serious can be exploited to accomplish remote code execution.
  • tvOS 9.2.2 – addresses more than 30 vulnerabilities in various operating system components, including the OS kernel, graphics components, Sandbox Profiles and more. These include denial of service, information leak, and the most serious of these can be exploited to accomplish remote code execution.
  • Safari 9.1.2 – addresses 12 vulnerabilities in the Safari web browser, most of them in the WebKit component. The most serious of these can be exploited to accomplish remote code execution.
  • iTunes 12.4.2 for Windows – addresses 15 vulnerabilities in the iTunes for Windows application software, most of them being memory corruption issues. The update is available for Windows 7 and later.
  • iCloud for Windows 5.2.1 – addresses 15 vulnerabilities in the iCloud for Windows software, most of them being memory corruption issues. The update is available for Windows 7 and later.

For more information about this and the previously issued patches and the vulnerabilities that they address, see the Apple Support web site at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222

Adobe

Adobe had an average month, with the issuance of three security updates that address vulnerabilities in their most popular software (Acrobat/Reader and Flash Player) as well as one of their developer tools.

  • On July 7, Adobe released APSB16-26, which contains security updates for Adobe Acrobat and Reader running on Windows and Mac, to address thirty vulnerabilities. It is rated critical and given a priority rating of 2 on both platforms.

Both of the following were released on their regular Patch Tuesday release schedule, on July 12:

  • APSB16-25 addresses 52 vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player running on Windows, Mac, Linux and ChromeOS. It is rated critical and has a priority rating of 1 on all except Adobe Flash Player for Linux, which is assigned a priority rating of 3.
  • APSB16-24 addresses a single vulnerability in Adobe XMP Toolkit for Java, which can lead to information disclosure. It is rated important and has a priority rating of 3.

For more information about these vulnerabilities and updates, see Adobe’s Security Bulletins and Advisories web site at https://helpx.adobe.com/security.html or see the individual bulletins linked in each bullet point above.

Google

In July, Google issued multiple security updates for Android that address a total of 108 vulnerabilities. These were released in two “patch level strings,” one on July 1 and one on July 5. Two of the issues in the July 1 string are rated critical and there are seven critical issues in the July 5 string. The critical issues include remote code execution vulnerabilities and elevation of privilege vulnerabilities.

For more information, see the Android Security Bulletin – July 2016 at https://source.android.com/security/bulletin/2016-07-01.html

On July 21, Google released Chrome v. 52.0.2743.82 to address multiple vulnerabilities for Windows, Mac and Linux. Exploitation of some of these vulnerabilities may allow a remote attacker to take control of an affected system.

For more information, see the Google Chrome Releases blog at http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com

Oracle

Oracle normally releases security updates on a quarterly cycle, in January, April, July and October.  On July 15, they issued a Critical Patch Update that addresses 276 new vulnerability fixes across all of their product families, including Oracle Java SE as well as many enterprise products. For more information, see the Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory – July 2016 at
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/security-advisory/cpujul2016-2881720.html

Mozilla

As of this writing (July 28, 2016), Mozilla has not released a new version of Firefox since v. 47, which was released in June and included 13 security fixes.

For more information about those vulnerabilities and fixes, and to check for new version releases, see Mozilla’s web site at https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox/

Linux

Popular Linux distros, as usual, have seen a number of security advisories and updates this month. As of the date of this writing (June 28) Ubuntu has issued 24 security notices, which is a relatively low number in comparison to most recent months. Many of these address multiple vulnerabilities and in some cases there are multiple advisories for the same vulnerabilities. Other commercial Linux vendors issued a similar number of updates.

USN-3043-1: OpenJDK 8 vulnerabilities – July 27

Multiple vulnerabilities were discovered in the OpenJDK JRE related to information disclosure, data integrity, and availability. An attacker could exploit these to cause a denial of service, expose sensitive data over the network, or possibly execute arbitrary code.

USN-3042-1: KDE-Libs vulnerability – July 26

Andreas Cord-Landwehr discovered that KDE-Libs incorrectly handled extracting certain archives. If a user were tricked into extracting a specially crafted archive, a remote attacker could use this issue to overwrite arbitrary files out of the extraction directory.

USN-3040-1: MySQL vulnerabilities – July 21

Multiple security issues were discovered in MySQL and this update includes new upstream MySQL versions to fix these issues. MySQL has been updated to 5.5.50 in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Ubuntu 15.10 has been updated to MySQL 5.6.31. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS has been updated to MySQL 5.7.13.

USN-3039-1: Django vulnerability – July 19

It was discovered that Django incorrectly handled the admin’s add/change related popup. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to perform a cross-site scripting attack.

USN-3038-1: Apache HTTP Server vulnerability – July 18

It was discovered that the Apache HTTP Server would set the HTTP_PROXY environment variable based on the contents of the Proxy header from HTTP requests. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue in combination with CGI scripts that honour the HTTP_PROXY variable to redirect outgoing HTTP requests.

USN-3023-1: Thunderbird vulnerabilities – July 18

It was discovered that NSPR incorrectly handled memory allocation. If a user were tricked in to opening a specially crafted message, an attacker could potentially exploit this to cause a denial of service via application crash, or execute arbitrary code.

USN-3037-1: Linux kernel (Vivid HWE) vulnerability – July 14

Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O (AIO) ring buffer to the other nodes. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).

USN-3036-1: Linux kernel (Utopic HWE) vulnerability – July 14

Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O (AIO) ring buffer to the other nodes. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).

USN-3035-3: Linux kernel (Wily HWE) vulnerability – July 14

USN-3035-1 fixed vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 15.10. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 15.10 for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O.

USN-3035-2: Linux kernel (Raspberry Pi 2) vulnerability – July 14

Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O (AIO) ring buffer to the other nodes. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).

USN-3035-1: Linux kernel vulnerability – July 14

Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O (AIO) ring buffer to the other nodes. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).

USN-3034-2: Linux kernel (Trusty HWE) vulnerability – July 14

USN-3034-1 fixed a vulnerability in the Linux kernel for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. This update provides the corresponding updates for the Linux Hardware Enablement (HWE) kernel from Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

USN-3034-1: Linux kernel vulnerability – July 14

Jan Stancek discovered that the Linux kernel’s memory manager did not properly handle moving pages mapped by the asynchronous I/O (AIO) ring buffer to the other nodes. A local attacker could use this to cause a denial of service (system crash).

USN-3033-1: libarchive vulnerabilities – July 14

Hanno Böck discovered that libarchive contained multiple security issues when processing certain malformed archive files. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause libarchive to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.

USN-3032-1: eCryptfs vulnerability – July 14

It was discovered that eCryptfs incorrectly configured the encrypted swap partition for certain drive types. An attacker could use this issue to discover sensitive information.

USN-3031-1: Pidgin vulnerabilities – July 12

Yves Younan discovered that Pidgin contained multiple issues in the MXit protocol support. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause Pidgin to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.

USN-3030-1: GD library vulnerabilities – July 11

It was discovered that the GD library incorrectly handled memory when using gdImageScaleTwoPass(). A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause a denial of service. This issue only affected Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. (CVE-2013-7456) It was discovered that the GD library incorrectly handled certain malformed XBM images.

USN-3029-1: NSS vulnerability – July 11

Tyson Smith and Jed Davis discovered that NSS incorrectly handled memory. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause NSS to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code. This update refreshes the NSS package to version 3.23 which includes the latest CA certificate bundle.

USN-3028-1: NSPR vulnerability – July 11

It was discovered that NSPR incorrectly handled memory allocation. A remote attacker could use this issue to cause NSPR to crash, resulting in a denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code.

USN-3027-1: Tomcat vulnerability – July 6

It was discovered that the Tomcat Fileupload library incorrectly handled certain upload requests. A remote attacker could possibly use this issue to cause a denial of service.

USN-3026-2: libusbmuxd vulnerability – July 5

It was discovered that libusbmuxd incorrectly handled socket permissions. A remote attacker could use this issue to access services on iOS devices, contrary to expectations.

USN-3026-1: libimobiledevice vulnerability – July 5

It was discovered that libimobiledevice incorrectly handled socket permissions. A remote attacker could use this issue to access services on iOS devices, contrary to expectations.

USN-3025-1: GIMP vulnerability – July 5

It was discovered that GIMP incorrectly handled malformed XCF files. If a user were tricked into opening a specially crafted XCF file, an attacker could cause GIMP to crash, or possibly execute arbitrary code with the user’s privileges.

USN-3024-1: Tomcat vulnerabilities – July 5

It was discovered that Tomcat incorrectly handled pathnames used by web applications in a getResource, getResourceAsStream, or getResourcePaths call. A remote attacker could use this issue to possibly list a parent directory . This issue only affected Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 15.10.

You may also like:

  • Ransomware FUD strikes again, this time against Office 365
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  • Quarterly updates for Exchange are out – Q2 2016


GFI Blog