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How I record decent audio in my creeper van.

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Hosted by Alpha32 on 2016-09-23 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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Part of the series: Podcasting HowTo

This series is designed to help the new host begin podcasting and to give the experienced host some tips and tricks.
The series is open to all.

I use a Plantronics USB headset, my Chromebook, Linux, and Audacity to record on the go.

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Duration: 00:02:24

  • ogg: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2125.ogg
  • spx: http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2125.spx
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After two years of keeping their bug bounty program private and relatively secret, Yelp is opening it up and has invited bug hunters to probe its sites, apps, and infrastructure.

Yelp bug bounty

“Our vulnerability reward payouts will go up to $ 15,000 USD for the most impactful exploits. If we accept your report, our minimum bounty is $ 100,” the company says.

Apparently, they have already paid bug bounties to dozens of bug hunters, who throughout the years helped them find and patch over a hundred potential vulnerabilities. The company has so far distributed a total of $ 65,360 to successful bug hunters.

The bug bounty program has been set up on HackerOne, and Yelp has asked researchers to look into their consumer sites, business owner’s site, mobile apps (both for users and business owners), their Yelp Reservations online management system, public API, Support Center, and their blogs.

In order to help them, they have provided an overview of these assets: their location, purpose, what’s under the hood (technical details), and pointers about what they should look for.

Yelp asked that they refrain from breaking their system, from using automated vulnerability scanners, and from testing newly acquired sites and companies for a period of one year after the acquisition. Also, not to test properties tied to Eat24, an online food-ordering service that Yelp has bought in 2015.

It is not unusual for companies to first set up a limited, private, invite-only bug bounty program, especially if their assets are many and their security team, which will have to deal with vulnerability reports and creating fixes, is small.

According to Yelp’s Engineering Manager Vivek Raman, the company’s security team is finally mature enough to handle the increased scrutiny of their assets that the program will likely bring about.


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Hacker Public Radio ~ The Technology Community Podcast Network

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Matt King discussing the availability of an open source multimedia focused website.

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Hosted by mattkingusa on 2016-08-17 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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Project available https://sourceforge.net/p/minimal-music-site

A very small responsive website for uploading content. Originally designed primarily for musicians needing an easy interface to share content. Upload files in the admin pages. Automatically saves files in directories and lists content on main pages by date. I'm sure there are many improvements that could be made.

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Duration: 00:12:48

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Information Security Podcasts


Munish Gupta

Senior Security Architect, Infosys Ltd

Munish Gupta, CISSP is working as Principal - Information & Cyber Risk Management with Infosys Ltd (NYSE: INFY) . He has rich experience of around 13+ years in providing...

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During most of my discussions with C-level stakeholders, a major question arises: What can we do to add further defense to our public cloud deployments? Are the built-in cloud security controls sufficient for my business, or do we need more?

My answer is quite simple: Yes, you need additional controls, depending on the workloads you are going to deploy in public clouds.

A Shared Responsibility

Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud services built on the shared responsibility model allow the organization to assess what additional security controls are needed. It’s the organization’s responsibility to secure the workload hosted in cloud environment; the cloud provider will be responsible below the operating system (OS) layer only.

While cloud providers are getting more mature and trying to offer a broader range of cloud security controls, it’s still the bare minimum. AWS provides the security group and NaCl capabilities as the minimum, for example, but not intrusion prevention controls, web application level security, threat intelligence capabilities or other features.

Another problem is that public cloud providers only provide site-to-site VPN, not client-to-site termination capability. This means that you need to route your user traffic (even for your remote users) through your corporate network, which results in performance issues, additional cost and increased complexity.

Next-Gen Cloud Security Controls

So now the question is: What should we do to add additional security controls at the perimeter of our public cloud deployments?

Security gateways and firewall providers are getting quite mature, and offerings are more aligned with industry needs. Next-gen firewall and UTM products are built for virtual environments from the bottom-up.

Investing more into these next-gen products will ensure better control of your public cloud and make your life easier during audits. Deploying a next-gen virtual firewall in your public cloud environment will also allow your security administrator to define context-based rules and ACLs to protect your environment. Additionally, it will permit your remote users to directly terminate to the public cloud environment.

In a nutshell, additional cloud security controls are worth every penny of your investment.

Read the IDC white paper: A CISO’s Guide to Enabling a Cloud Security Strategy

Topics: Cloud, Cloud Security, Cloud Services, Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)


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