European

The 2016 Open Source Jobs Report released earlier this year by Dice and The Linux Foundation analyzed trends for open source careers and the motivations of professionals in the industry. Now, the data have been broken down to focus specifically on European open source professionals, and how they compare to their counterparts around the world.

open source jobs

This is the fifth year Dice and The Linux Foundation have partnered to produce the jobs report. The four previous years’ research focused exclusively on the job market for Linux professionals, but this year’s installment looks at the broader category of open source professionals. Overall trends between Europe and the world are generally similar, but show that open source careers may be even more in demand and rewarding in Europe than the rest of the world.

“Demand for open source talent is growing and companies struggle to find experienced professionals to fill open roles,” said Bob Melk, president of Dice. “Rising salaries for open source professionals indicate companies recognize the need to attract, recruit and retain qualified open source professionals on a global scale. Regardless of where they reside around the world, these professionals are motivated by the opportunity to work on interesting projects.”

European confidence is high

Europeans are more confident than their global counterparts in the open source job market. Of over one thousand European respondents, 60 percent believe it would be fairly or very easy to find a new position this year, as opposed to only 50 percent saying it would be easy globally.

In fact, 50 percent of Europeans reported receiving more than 10 calls from recruiters in the six months prior to the survey, while only 22 percent of respondents worldwide reported this level of engagement. While worldwide 27 percent of respondents received no calls at all from recruiters, only five percent of Europeans said the same.

The most in-demand skills

Application development skills are in high demand in Europe. Twenty-three percent of European open source professionals reported application development as the most in-demand skill in open source – higher than any other skill. Globally, only 11 percent identified application development as the most in-demand skill, second behind DevOps at 13 percent. DevOps was second among Europeans at 12 percent.

Retaining staff

Employers in Europe are offering more incentives to hold onto staff. Forty percent of European open source professionals report that in the past year they have received a raise, 27 percent report improved work-life balance, and 24 percent report more flexible schedules.

This compares to 31 percent globally reporting raises, and 20 percent globally reporting either a better work-life balance or more flexible work schedules. Overall, only 26 percent of Europeans stated their employer had offered them no new incentives this year, compared to 33 percent globally.

What differentiates open source jobs?

Open source professionals enjoy working on interesting projects more than anything. European open source professionals agreed with their global counterparts that the best thing about working in open source is the ability to work on interesting projects, at 34 percent (31 percent globally). However, while respondents around the world said the next best things were working with cutting-edge technology (18 percent) and collaboration with a global community (17 percent), European professionals selected job opportunities second at 17 percent, followed by both cutting-edge technologies and collaboration tied at 16 percent each. Five percent of European respondents said money and perks are the best part of their job, more than double the two percent who chose this response worldwide.

“European technology professionals, government organizations and corporations have long embraced open source,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “The impressive levels of adoption of and respect for open source clearly have translated into more demand for qualified open source professionals, providing strong opportunities for developers, DevOps professionals and others.”

The findings of the annual Open Source Jobs Report are based on survey responses from more than 4,500 open source professionals worldwide, including 1,082 in Europe.


Help Net Security

“The confidentiality of online communications by individuals and businesses is essential for the functioning of modern societies and economies. The EU rules designed to protect privacy in electronic communications need to reflect the world that exists today,” European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) Giovanni Buttarelli opined after reviewing a new proposal on the ePrivacy Directive.

European privacy advisor wants encryption without backdoors

The existing ePrivacy Directive is currently under revision. The European Commission is collecting feedback on the proposal, and should prepare a new, updated version of the legislation by the end of 2016. One of the purposes of the EDPS is to advise EU institutions on policies and legislation that affect privacy.

In his opinion, the EDPS says that the scope of new ePrivacy rules needs to be broad enough to cover all forms of electronic communications irrespective of network or service used, not only those offered by traditional telephone companies and internet service providers. Individuals must be afforded the same level of protection for all types of communication such as telephone, Voice over IP services, mobile phone messaging app, Internet of Things (machine to machine).

The updated rules should also ensure that the confidentiality of users is protected on all publicly accessible networks, including Wi-Fi services in hotels, coffee shops, shops, airports and networks offered by hospitals to patients, universities to students, and hotspots created by public administrations.

Any interference with the right to confidentiality of communications is contrary to the European Charter of Fundamental Rights.

No communications should be subject to unlawful tracking and monitoring without freely given consent, whether by cookies, device-fingerprinting, or other technological means. Users must also have user-friendly and effective mechanisms to give, or not give, their consent. In order to better protect the confidentiality and security of electronic communications, the current consent requirement for traffic and location data must be strengthened.

The existing rules in the ePrivacy Directive protecting against unsolicited communications, such as advertising or promotional messages, should be updated and strengthened and require prior consent of the recipients for all forms of unsolicited electronic communications.

The new rules should also clearly allow users to use end-to-end encryption (without “backdoors”) to protect their electronic communications. Decryption, reverse engineering or monitoring of communications protected by encryption should be prohibited.

A new provision for organisations to periodically disclose aggregate numbers indicating EU and non-EU law enforcement or government requests for information would offer some welcome transparency in the sensitive, complex and often contentious area of government access to communications.

The new rules should complement, and where necessary, specify the protections available under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). They should also maintain the existing, higher level of protection in those instances where the ePrivacy Directive offers more specific safeguards than in the GDPR.


Help Net Security