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mobile security strippedWe’re all familiar with the cartoon image of a character stopping a water leak by plugging a finger into the hole, only for another leak to start, needing another finger, and so on, until the character is soaked by a wave of water.

It’s a little like the current, fragmented state of mobile security – the range of threats is growing fast, outpacing current security measures. Also, the devices themselves have inherent vulnerabilities that can be exploited by resourceful attackers. So it’s no surprise that enterprises are struggling with the issue of mobile security.

Finding flaws and mRATs

The list of potential security challenges and vulnerabilities across Android and iOS devices is complex. It starts with the devices’ mobility: they are connecting to public cellular networks, corporate networks, public hotspots to home internet providers and back again. This makes them vulnerable to Man in the Middle (MitM) attacks via rogue cellular base stations, WiFi hotspots or compromised public networks, allowing attackers to track, intercept and eavesdrop on data traffic and even voice calls, using SS7 protocol exploits.

Then, the Android and iOS mobile operating systems themselves have been shown time and time again to be plagued with vulnerabilities that smart malicious hackers can exploit to their advantage. One major recent example is ‘Quadrooter’, a privilege escalation vulnerability shown to affect over 900 million Android devices. These vulnerabilities often have long patching cycles which can take months to roll out, leaving millions of devices vulnerable to remote attack.

Similarly, iOS has also recently been in the headlines after news broke that it had been compromised in the NSO hack. This affected all Apple devices, making the iOS, the phones resources and any application running on it, including security apps such as anti-virus, vulnerable to attack. It’s worth highlighting that this wasn’t discovered by Apple or any detection applications but was only discovered because the attacker was negligent in concealing it.

Mobile remote access trojans (mRATs) give an attacker the ability to remotely access the resources and functions on Android or iOS devices, and stealthily exfiltrate data without the user being aware. mRATs are often embedded in supposedly benign apps available from appstores. Compromised or falsely certified apps are another security risk, as they can allow attackers to remotely take over devices, using the device resources without the user being aware.

As a result, the mobile security industry is always playing catch-up. Zero-day attacks, where cybercriminals exploit inbuilt vulnerabilities on mobile operating systems that haven’t yet been patched or even identified, are a major ongoing problem.

Protection versus performance

Ultimately, there are three main threat vectors for mobile devices. These are: targeting and intercepting the communications to and from devices; targeting the devices’ external interfaces (Cellular, WiFI, Bluetooth, USB, NFC, Web etc.) for the purpose of device penetration and planting malicious code (virtually as well as physically); and targeting the data on the device and the resources/functions the device/underlying OS provides access to such as microphone, camera, GPS, storage, network connectivity, etc.

While there is a wealth of technologies designed to help manage the security gaps on devices – from Enterprise Mobile Management to mobile anti-malware– these protections come at a price. First, a collection of multiple security tools and processes is a big drain on processing power, complex to manage, and doesn’t really fix the underlying device and OS vulnerabilities. Second, the conventional approach to mobile security is based on locking down or denying features and functions. This causes further problems on the end user’s acceptance front. It’s critical to balance security and usability: If protecting the device forces people to change the way they use it, they will find workarounds that will also undermine security measures.

So if enterprises are to continue harnessing the benefits of mobile devices without compromising their performance and usability, then we need to rethink our approach to mobile security, from the ground up.

Secure foundations

This new approach starts with the foundations of the mobile device: the OS and firmware. As the various software layers on devices have fundamental vulnerabilities which can be exploited, these should be replaced with secure, hardened versions from which the flaws have been removed/patched and advanced security layers have been put in place to effectively manage and protect against those three threat vectors mentioned above. This means attackers cannot use their conventional techniques to target vulnerabilities – but the device is still using an OS that the user is familiar with, giving users access to the full app ecosystem, so usability is not affected or restricted.

This stronger foundation is then used to build a strong, security architecture consisting of four layers to address each of the three main mobile threat vectors. The first layer is the Encryption Layer, in charge of encrypting all data stored on the phone, as well as all traffic from and to the device, securing all communications, whether voice, data or messaging, from any network sniffing and man-in-the-middle attacks.

The second layer is the Protection Layer, securing the device’s externally available interfaces, from WiFi, cellular, USB, NFC, Bluetooth to web. These need protecting against threats using an embedded firewall to monitor and block all downloads and exploit attempts.

Next layer is the Prevention Layer, monitoring for unauthorized attempts to access operating system functions like stored data, the microphone or camera, location technology and so on. These need their own specialist protective technologies.

The final layer is the Detection and Enforcement Layer monitoring, detecting and blocking execution attempts of malicious code or misbehaving apps, in the same way that we currently monitor for device and network anomalies on corporate networks.

In conclusion, mobile security is currently too fragmented, and the range of threats growing too fast for conventional protections. Instead of plugging leaks as they appear, we need to start again, from the foundations up – and fundamentally rethink the way in which we protect and secure mobile devices.


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